Robert Blinov’s blog

The wider problem, part 1. Flight shaming

When something seems like a solution to a problem, look beyond.

Greta Thunberg insists on shaming people for flying. She even forced her mother—an opera singer—not to hop on a world tour. While some voyages are faster and cheaper by rail than by plane (Genoa to Rome, for instance), others are not.

Don’t tell me to take a five-day train from Moscow to Sanremo because it’s better for the environment. It might not be. It’s a waste of time to spend five days instead of eight hours to get from one place to another. During the extra four days in Sanremo I could have invented something that would in the long-term help the planet more.

If business people were to cancel their flights to meetings “in order to save the planet” we as a society could be losing more: breakthrough ideas would not be shared, so new products would not be created, therefore the economy would not develop faster and polluting factories would exist for longer.

The death penalty

Death penalty as a punishment is unacceptable. Death is bad whether it’s Stalin’s or Einstein’s: a corpse can’t acknowledge own mistakes and become better.

 1 comment    8   14 d   death

Conspiracy theory videos

  1. A conspiracy theory video gets lowered down in the index because it is nonsense.
  2. The author of the video claims that it got lowered down because the conspirators want to hide the truth.

 No comments    11   1 mon   observations

QR codes

It’s a bad scenario when QR codes are being scanned by a human. It’s a good one a human approaches a machine that scans his or her QR code.

But the latter is just a cheaper option instead of NFC.

 No comments    23   1 mon   design   user interface

Stacking knowledge

In first grade, they tell you X.

In the third, they tell you it’s untrue: the reality is much more complex than what you were first told.

Nobody should be mistold things just because he or she is on Level 1. Instead, knowledge should be stacked with progress in detail.

 No comments    20   1 mon   education
 No comments    31   2 mon   food   Italy

Autorenewals and common sense

I got this in the mail today:

Your WhoisGuard subscription listed below is expiring soon.
Act fast and renew WhoisGuard today to keep contact information attached to your domain hidden in public Whois.
It’s FREE to renew, so make sure that your privacy remains protected.

This is an example of bad design. If it’s free to renew, why don’t I have WhoisGuard set until hell freezes over?

 No comments    19   2 mon   common sense   design

The theory of little scars

Sometimes the world finds out about a famous person’s death. “Died from age”, the reporters say. I don’t understand how someone in their right mind can say such a thing. Age is just a number that shows how old the person is. It doesn’t impact anything directly but the amount of candles on a cake.

The more one lives the more one has experienced—good or bad. By having a paper cut on my finger I might have let a couple of dangerous bacteriae into my body—nothing excruciating—but many such cuts are lethal. So is the story for any other disease.

People don’t die from age, they die from many little scars that pile up over time.

 No comments    32   2 mon   death   red pill

History for Private Browsing

Sometimes I need to use Private Browsing in Safari. It’s obviously a misnomer because there’s nothing private about it, but it’s generally useful to get better deals.

Once I close that window and I need to reopen the website later, I have to search for everything again. Dear Apple, please fix this!

 No comments    27   2 mon   Safari

“Do not disturb” in hotels

Most hotels give customers door tags with “Do not disturb” written on them. I don’t understand why. It’s obvious that no person ever wants to be ever disturbed. If you think that it’s something about cleaning the room, it isn’t: hotels give out these tags even when you’re staying for one night.

Plus, in hotels with actual keys, you give them to the reception when leaving. So they know when you’re gone. In those with plastic cards, the hotel knows I’m in my room as soon I as open the door.

I am in one of these today, and there’s a button instead of a tag. The button works only when I have my card inside the slot (I tried the business card approach; everything works only when the card is in there), so I got a second card. And as soon as I come back from outside DND is deactivated so I have to press the button once more. This button would be super useful if it would physically block the door from being opened by hotel staff or anybody else with the key, but it just shines a barely noticeable LED.

P. S. Does the Ritz Carlton do this?

 3 comments    74   5 mon   hotels   life   madness
Earlier Ctrl + ↓