3 posts tagged

naming

A better abbreviation for sine & cosine

For some weird reason the abbreviation for sine is sin and cos for cosine. This is madness compared to the beautiful and logical abbreviation for tangent and cotangent: tg and ctg respectively.

My proposal:

sine si
cosine csi
tangent tg
cotangent ctg

Quite obviously, I submitted them to my local ISO representative for review.

Oct 28   abbreviations   maths   naming

An impossible name

A review of a person’s name who is friends with my friends.

Çårlø Mãrçölîñï. What a mess! This name can’t be true. Let alone most of the diacritics on these letters are from different languages, some of them are used without necessity.

Çårlø.
Ç.c that sounds like s in Catalan, French, Friulian, Occitan, Manx. Used in loanwords in English, Basque, Spanish, and Dutch. Similar to the x in Mexico being pronounced h in Spanish. Nothing bad so far.
Å. Very similar to a in Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, North Frisian, Walloon, Chamorro, Lule Sami, Skolt Sami, Southern Sami, and Greenlandic.
Oops! There’s no point to go further with the first name, as these two letters don’t simultaneously exist in any language.

Mãrçölîñï.
Ã. An interesting vowel used in Portuguese, Guaraní, Kashubian, Taa, Aromarian, and Vietnamese. Each uses it differently.
With ç already reviewed this last name is doomed.

I know that this name has been stained with diacritics for the fun of a “cool” handle. Nevertheless, it is important how internauts will call you in real life, Sarlœ Marsöligni.

Oct 7   language   naming

It’s not San Remo, but Sanremo

The city where I live during the summer is called Sanremo. The name originated from the local dialect, where the name of the area’s patron, saint Romulus (Italian: san Romolo), was shortened to become Sanromu. Centuries later, locals who weren’t interested in history started believing that there has been a saint Remus, leaving a plethora of misspelling and misinterpretation behind.

Oct 7   history   language   naming   Sanremo